Martin Kaymer
4

Scorecard
Biography
ROUND
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
OUT
10
11
12
13
14
15
16
17
18
IN
TOTAL
1
4
4
5
3
6
4
4
4
4
38
4
3
4
4
6
4
3
4
4
36
74
2
5
4
5
3
4
4
3
4
6
38
5
4
3
3
6
4
3
5
4
37
75
3
4
5
4
2
5
4
3
5
4
36
4
4
2
4
6
4
4
3
4
35
71
4
4
5
4
3
4
4
3
3
4
34
5
4
3
4
6
5
3
4
4
38
72
Par
4
5
4
3
4
4
3
4
5
36
5
4
3
4
5
4
3
4
4
36
72
m
403
520
411
195
449
388
206
450
545
3567
500
419
200
406
550
431
193
437
459
3595
7162
ROUND
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
OUT
1
4
4
5
3
6
4
4
4
4
38
2
5
4
5
3
4
4
3
4
6
38
3
4
5
4
2
5
4
3
5
4
36
4
4
5
4
3
4
4
3
3
4
34
Par
4
5
4
3
4
4
3
4
5
36
m
403
520
411
195
449
388
206
450
545
3567
ROUND
10
11
12
13
14
15
16
17
18
IN
TOTAL
1
4
3
4
4
6
4
3
4
4
36
74
2
5
4
3
3
6
4
3
5
4
37
75
3
4
4
2
4
6
4
4
3
4
35
71
4
5
4
3
4
6
5
3
4
4
38
72
Par
5
4
3
4
5
4
3
4
4
36
72
m
500
419
200
406
550
431
193
437
459
3595
7162
Stats
ROUND 1
ROUND 2
ROUND 3
ROUND 4
TOTAL
RANK
Eagles
0
0
0
0
0
11
Birdies
4
2
5
2
13
17
Pars
9
11
9
14
43
16
Bogeys
4
5
4
2
15
3
Double Bogeys/+
1
0
0
0
1
15
Other
0
0
0
0
0
Putts per round
31
31
27
30
30
4
Putts per GIR
1.83
1.83
1.91
1.91
1.87
4
Greens in regulation
66.67 %
66.67 %
61.11 %
61.11 %
63.89 %
13
Sand Saves
0/1
1/1
0/0
1/1
2/3

Born: 28 December 1984.

Turned pro: 2005.

Family: Single.

Special interests: Football, basketball, go-karting.

Career highlights: In 2010 he won three tournaments on the European Tour and his first Major, the PGA Championship. He finished the season as the European Tour's number one. He earned €4.5-million in prize money over the season, beating the record Lee Westwood set the previous year. In 2007 became the first German to receive the Sir Henry Cotton Rookie of the Year award on the European Tour. He has been on the winning European Ryder Cup team in 2010 and 2012. In 2012 he holed the putt that ensured Europe would retain the Ryder Cup at Medinah.

2014 highlights: He won his second Major with a dominant display in the US Open at Pinehurst. He also won The Players Championship and was part of the victorious European Ryder Cup team.

2014 Majors: The Masters - T31st. The US Open - 1st. The Open - 70th. The PGA Championship - Missed Cut.

NGC record: Fourth appearance. 2011 - 8th. 2012 - 1st, 2013 - T16th.

Story

Martin Kaymer believes he was given a gift. And for that reason, he says, he will never tire of talking about it.

Kaymer's eight-foot putt to seal victory for Europe in the 2012 Ryder Cup at Medinah is still as fresh in his memory today as it was when he felt the hopes of a continent on his shoulders.

In Kaymer's mind, the fact that he made it is the reason everybody still talks about it. And to be able to talk about it in a positive way is the gift he believes he was given.

"I was given the opportunity to make one of the most pressure filled and memorable putts in the history of our sport. So, yes, memories are strong and will stay with me for the rest of my life," he said. "There will never ever be a more important putt in my life."

Kaymer returns to Sun City this year as a man also known for claiming his second Major when he won the US Open at Pinehurst.

He did so with a record score over 36 holes of 130, and he went on to win by a crushing eight strokes.

It was one of the highlights in another spectacular year for the affable German, who also won The Players Championship and was on another winning European team in the Ryder Cup at Gleneagles.

In fact, there have been some who've suggested that Kaymer's ability to dominate the big stage this year resembled that of Tiger Woods in 2000.

And there is no doubt still plenty to come from a career that began when a 10-year-old wandered out of his yard and onto the nearby Mettmann Golf Club in Düsseldorf to hit his first putt.

His father, Horst, did not go lightly on him and forced Kaymer to play off the back tees from a young age. Kaymer recalls how his father didn't even allow him to tee the ball up when hitting driver in the belief that when he was given this privilege in a tournament it would make the game that much easier for him.

By the age of 15 he was already a scratch golfer. He went on to win the 2003 Austrian Amateur and 2004 German Amateur titles, as well as a tournament on the European Professional Development Tour (EPD Tour).

In 2005 Kaymer turned professional and continued to play on the EPD Tour through to 2006, winning five tournaments and the Order of Merit. One of his finest moments included the 59 he shot in the second round of his victory in the Habsburg Classic.

Progressing to the Challenge Tour, Kaymer won twice in eight stars here and earned his European Tour card for the 2007 season.

At first he struggled to make an impact, missing the cut in six of his first seven tournaments. But when he broke through, he did so in style.

During the Portugal Masters in October 2007, Kaymer shot a first round 61 and went on to finish seventh. A finish of sixth in the Volvo Masters thereafter saw him end the season in 41st place on the Order of Merit and earned him the Sir Henry Cotton Rookie of the Year Award. He was the first German to achieve this.

In 2008 he was the only player under 25 in the top 50 on the world rankings. That same year he finished second behind Tiger Woods in the Dubai Desert Classic.

Steady victories carried him through the 2008 and 2009 seasons before he took the step up to Major champion when he won the 2010 PGA Championship at Whistling Straits, becoming only the second German after Bernhard Langer to win a Major.

In 2011, Kaymer displaced Woods at number two on the world ranking. And then, with his second-place finish in the WGC Accenture Match Play Championship, he nudged Lee Westwood out of the world number one spot.

But the number one ranking and the pressure associated with it took its toll on Kaymer. He admits he made some mistakes, and if he ever gets there again he'd do things differently.

"I would say no to a lot of the things I got invited to. You get offered a lot of nice things that you always wanted to do in your life, or that you were dreaming of when you were young. Then, all of a sudden you have the opportunity to do all of that, and you say, 'Why not' But then you lose a lot of time for practice and your private life."

"Sometimes you have those moments where you're not really happy, and you wonder why. You're playing good golf, financially you're fine, your family is fine, but you're still not happy because you don't have time for yourself."

Such introspection included a bit of an obsession about not being able to hit a draw, which he felt was something the world number one needed to be able to do.

He set about remodelling his swing, and of course it came at a price as he dropped to 63rd on the world rankings.

Kaymer was also not immune to the jibes from his critics during his slump, and this affected him as well.

But it's often overlooked just how hard he works on his game, and his overall fitness. His fitness regime has been described as "ferocious", and he's followed some of the great hard workers in the game by hitting balls until his hands have bled as he worked his way out of his slump.

But arguably the most impressive thing about Martin Kaymer is his humility.

After winning The Players Championship he was photographed at Jacksonville Airport waiting to board a plane. It wasn't a private plane, which would certainly have been befitting of one of golf's biggest stars.

It was a normal public airline. And he wasn't waiting in a specially-reserved area either. He was seated on the floor, amongst ordinary passengers, and charging his phone in a wall plug.

There's also a story of him paying for the coffees of two ladies in front of him at a Starbucks who didn't have enough on them, and without them even knowing who he was.

For a 29-year-old, Kaymer shows incredible maturity and a willingness to think deeply about life and his place in it.

"We all need to give both others and ourselves a bit more space. In today's society we judge everything far too quickly. There is this saying, 'form is temporary, class is permanent'. I would rather subscribe to that idea."

Kaymer's return to Sun City will certainly be met with approval from a gallery who still remembers how he beat Charl Schwartzel in 2012 to secure a German double that year, with Langer winning the Champions Challenge for senior golfers.

"I felt more pressure than usual because everybody, even the German media, was talking about a German double after Bernhard won," said Kaymer.

"You look at all those great names on the bronze plaques on the walkway to the ninth green, and it's nice to know mine is on there as well."